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Android, SD cards, and exfat

I needed to prepare some SD cards for deployment to Android phones. After formatting the first SD card in a phone I moved it to my laptop and was met with the "Error mounting... unknown filesystem type exfat" error. That was somewhat startling as GVFS gracefully handles almost anything you throw at it. Following this I dropped down to the CLI to inspect how the SD card was formatted.

VERR_PDM_DEVHLPR3_VERSION_MISMATCH

After downloading a Virtualbox ready ISO of OpenVAS the newly created virtual machine to host the instance failed to start with an VERR_PDM_DEVHLPR3_VERSION_MISMATCH error. The quick-and-dirty solution was to set the instance to use USB 1.1. This setting is changed under Machine -> Settings -> USB -> Select USB 1.1 OHCI Controller.. After that change the instance now boots and runs the installer.

opensuse 42.3

Finally got around to updating my work-a-day laptop to openSUSE 42.3. As usual I did an in-place distribution update via zypper. This involves replacing the previous version repositories with the current version repositories - and then performing a dup. And as usual the process was quick and flawless. After a reboot everything just-works and I go back to doing useful things.

Which Application?

Which application manages this type of file? How can I, by default, open files of type X with application Y? These questions float around in GNOME forums and mailing lists on a regular basis.

The answer is: gvfs-mime .

LINUX CA Certificate Deployment

Creating an in house signing [aka CA] certificate is a common practice; this allows you to generate free cerficates for internal use. For Windows hosts distributing this CA certificate to all the clients and relevant servers can be accomplished using Active Directory GPOs. Certificate management on LINUX hosts on the other hand has always been a swamp of tedium where the certificates often need to be configured into each client or service. Recent distributions have eased this process considerably by including a quasi-standardized set of scripts and certificate store locations.

The Quest For The Lost Pointer

On the screen you have a pointer - it points at thing! It is used to point at, select [highlight], drag, and numerous other things. The mouse pointer has been there and looked more-or-less the same for decades now; my pointer in GNOME Shell looks and works almost identically to the pointer I had on my GEOS desktop (1986). It has stayed the same because it works.

Drag-N-Drop Message Format

A little recognized feature in GNOME is the that e-mail messages can be drag-n-dropped from GNOME's Evolution to other applications. When a message from Evolution is dropped into Nautilus the message will be saved to the corresponding folder as an mbox file. This is useful, but probably not optimal, for a desktop environment.

To optimize this behavior the gsettings command can be used to change the default format as a PDF.

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